What Artists Can Learn From Justin Bieber About Social Media Marketing

I don’t know a single Justin Bieber song, nor do I associate with anyone who knows a Justin Bieber song. I’m just not in that demographic. Yet I know he is a pop star. I know he exists. I have no idea if he’s talented. I just know that a lot of little tweenies like him.

What I also know about Justin Beieber (thanks to Wikipedia) is how he became the overnight sensation that he is. It all started in 2008 when his mother began uploading home videos of Bieber onto one of the oldest social networks around: YouTube. That’s right, not MySpace, or Friendster, or Facebook. YouTube. And she didn’t even do it to make him popular, or to market him. She just wanted to share videos of her son with family members. But the Internet being the way it is, the videos eventually landed on the eyeballs of a talent scout named Scooter Braun. Rather than creating blog, or buying expensive equipment, or hiring a production crew, Scooter Braun encouraged kids to videotape Bieber using consumer grade video cameras, and continued uploading videos to the same YouTube channel that Bieber’s mother created. The rest is history.

Justin Bieber didn’t have a Twitter account until 2009. Today, of course, Bieber’s marketing includes an arsenal of social media marketing tools. Looking at Justin Bieber’s humble beginnings on YouTube should illustrate to artists that making a living off your talent isn’t just about producing good content. You have to start sharing it, too. Bieber started sharing his talents with his most loyal fans first: family, friends, and neighbors. People around the world are always looking for good talent, so it was inevitable that Bieber would be discovered. He was discovered because his mother inadvertently created an opportunity for her son to be discovered. Imagine what you could do with a little intention. If you are talented, the only way to be discovered is to create opportunities for yourself to be discovered.

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